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Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile Dysfunction

The inability to obtain and maintain a hard adequate erection for intercourse is referred to as erectile dysfunction (impotence). Having erection issues now and then isn’t usually a cause for alarm. However, if erectile dysfunction is a long-term condition, it can create stress, lower self-esteem, and lead to interpersonal issues. Problems obtaining or maintaining an erection can be a symptom of a more serious underlying health condition, as well as a risk factor for heart disease. 

Even if you’re ashamed, go to your doctor if you’re concerned about erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction can sometimes be reversed simply by treating the underlying disease. In some circumstances, drugs or other forms of direct treatment are required.

What causes an erection?

ED can be caused by issues at any point throughout the erection process. The increased blood flow into your penis causes an erection. Sexual thoughts or physical contact with your penis are both known to increase blood flow. 

When a person’s penis is sexually stimulated, a muscle within the penis’ blood vessels relaxes. This increases blood flow through the penile arteries, which fills two chambers within the penis. The penis stiffens when the chambers fill with blood. 

When the muscles in the blood vessels flex, the collected blood can flow out through the penile veins, the erection is over. 

Symptoms

It’s difficult to get or retain a strong enough erection when you have Erectile Dysfunction (ED). Your primary care practitioner or an Urologist can assist you if ED becomes a regular and bothersome problem. 

It’s difficult to get or retain a strong enough erection when you have Erectile Dysfunction (ED). Your primary care practitioner or an Urologist can assist you if ED becomes a regular and bothersome problem. 

  • Low self-esteem
  • Depression
  • Distress for the man and his partner 

The presence of ED in a man could be a major warning sign of cardiovascular disease, indicating that blockages are forming in his vascular system. According to some studies, men with ED are more likely to have a heart attack, stroke, or circulatory problems in their legs. ED can also lead to: 

Erectile dysfunction diagnosis:

A physical examination, as well as an evaluation of your health and sexual history, can all be part of the ED testing process. Additional tests may be ordered by your doctor to evaluate if your symptoms are due to an underlying condition.

 

Treatment

Taking care of your heart and vascular health is the first step in treating ED. ‘Risk factors,’ as identified by your doctor, may be modified or improved. You may be asked to alter your eating habits, quit smoking, boost your workouts, or refrain from using drugs or alcohol. It’s possible that you’ll be offered alternatives to the medications you’re taking. (Avoid stopping or changing prescription medications without first consulting your doctor.) Treatment for emotional issues may also be recommended by your health care physician. Relationship issues, life stressors, melancholy or worry from previous ED issues could all contribute to these symptoms (performance anxiety). The treatments listed below can be used to treat ED on its own. 

Testosterone Therapy may cure normal erections or help when paired with ED medicines in the rare circumstances where a low sex drive and low blood levels of Testosterone are to blame for ED.

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